Silent film Essays & Research Papers

Best Silent film Essays

  • Silent Film and Music - 1616 Words
    1. Describe the three basic types of music heard in original scores during the silent film era and cites specific examples from The Birth of a Nation. (10 points) The three basic types of music heard in original scores during the silent film era are Adaptations of Classics, Arrangements of tunes, and newly composed music. In most cases, adaptation of classics involves action and dramatic scenes. It is borrowing a large amount of an already existing composition for use in film score. In The...
    1,616 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Relevance of Sound in Silent Films
    The Relevance of Sound in Silent Films Before the introduction of sound in the film industry, two prominent silent films during the 1920’s were Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror and The Battleship Potemkin. In Chapter 11 of The Film Experience, Corrigan and White pose a question regarding the use of sound in silent films. Corrigan and White asked whether sound allows film to fulfill a mission to reproduce the world, as it is, or if sound hinders cinema’s visual expression. Considering Corrigan...
    1,268 Words | 4 Pages
  • Nosferatu: Silent Film and Dracula
    Horror films of today employ several film techniques to invoke responses from the viewer. However, early silent films relied more on these techniques because without a script, the viewer needs another way to interpret the film. The 1922 silent film Nosferatu directed by F.W. Murnau is one of the first of it's kind to apply what most would consider to be more modern film techniques. Montage plays a key role in this film, as does unusual camera angles, over acting, early special effects,...
    974 Words | 6 Pages
  • silent films vs modern day films
     In my opinion I prefer modern day films to silent films. I agree with you that silent films are very boring and dull compared to modern day films. Modern day films have more advanced technology making the film better in general. But it is good to understand and learn about silent films even though you don’t enjoy them, they are an important part of history. Modern films have a lot of characters and have a bigger better storyline to follow. There are plenty of other things that make modern day...
    450 Words | 2 Pages
  • All Silent film Essays

  • Silent Film Star: Louise Brooks
    Louise Brooks, a legendary actress of the silent film era; one of the greatest actresses in the silent film era known for her sensual portrayal of her characters, personality, and her popular bobbed hairstyle.(C. Moritz (Ed.), 1985) Louise, commonly known as her childhood name of Brooksie, was born in Cherryvale, Kansas, on November 14, 1906.(IMDb.com, 2013) Louise did not only have a future in show business, but also in dancing, though eventually retiring at the age of 32 in...
    516 Words | 2 Pages
  • Music and Film - 995 Words
    Exam 1 Essay Portion 1) Describe the three basic types of music heard in original scores during the silent film era and cites specific examples from The Birth of a Nation. (10 points) Music is an important form of art; it has always been utilized by each and every culture for entertainment purpose. Earlier in the silent film era, music was generally not included in the films but played in the beginning or at the end to entertain the audience. Later music was used in the form of...
    995 Words | 3 Pages
  • Evolution of Film - 1138 Words
    Many of us can share the love and excitement of walking into a dimly lit theater, of lying back in a squishy chair, of reaching with one hand into a bowl of butter-soaked popcorn; and of resting for two care-free hours to watch a movie meant to bring great emotion to the audience. Since their creation, movies have become a significant part of American culture. Today hundreds of millions of dollars are spent on creating movies and just as much is spent on viewing them. To keep up with popular...
    1,138 Words | 3 Pages
  • Gags of the Silent Era - 1256 Words
    S.T. History of Film Studies Gags of the Silent Era During the era of silent films and even today in modern movies, the idea of a gag is meant to inspire laughter. A gag is a moment in a film or story where something silly happens and usually it is told though visual language rather than actual words. In silent films, gags were told entirely through body language and often times extremely exaggerated or cartoon-like actions and reactions were used to emphasize the humor. Charlie...
    1,256 Words | 3 Pages
  • History of Silent Movies - 4514 Words
    Pioneer developments in "moving pictures" occurred during the 1890s with the patenting of the kinetograph and kinetoscope (1891) by Thomas Edison and W.K.L. Dickson in the United States and the cinematograph (1895) by the Lumiere brothers in France. By the turn of the century, films less than a minute in length were being exhibited at major fairs in the U.S. and abroad. Soon after, audiences began flocking to movie houses called "Nickelodeons," one-floor venues, where short films (approximately...
    4,514 Words | 12 Pages
  • Silent Movies (Summary) - 659 Words
    SILENT MOVIES Talk to people who saw films for the first time when they were silent, and they will tell you the experience was magic. The silent film, with music, had extraordinary powers to draw an audience into the story, and an equally potent capacity to make their imagination work. They had to supply the voices and the sound effects, and because their minds were engaged, they appreciated the experience all the more. The audience was the final creative contributor to the process of making a...
    659 Words | 2 Pages
  • Classic Hollywood in Comedy Films
    During Hollywood's classical period, the seamless style was particularly favored, it championed narrative economy. In other words, films were constructed so that the viewer was not aware of the construction. This practice of effacing a film's construction actually depends on a complex system of visual codes. Hollywood films, as opposed to art films or some types of foreign films, embrace a narrative that is highly efficient and that is determined by cause and effect. For example, The...
    1,101 Words | 3 Pages
  • Silent Movies vs. the Invention of Sound
    Kim Battaglin Drama 150 Tu 6:35 – 9:40 PM Silent movies vs. the invention of sound Throughout time human have had the necessity to express their emotions as a form of art. The world stopped when they first watched on screen people and objects in movement, but since time changes, so do our minds, interests and traditions. When people thought nothing better than silent films could arrive, the unexpected happened, the first talkie came out. Their movie stars for the...
    482 Words | 2 Pages
  • Article: Film Club - 371 Words
    Lights, Camera, Action! Tired of a boring Monday evening? What about transforming this day, which is told to be an useless day, into a funny time by watching a movie and making friends? That is what the Film Club offers to members of our college. And it doesn't stop there. Sharing impressions about the movie watched and discovering new things about plots and stunts of films with an expert in the area is a great way to practise and improve your English. The routine of a member of the Film...
    371 Words | 2 Pages
  • Film and Great Train Robbery
    The 'reactive character' triggers a response and tells the audience how to view a scene? | True | | False | What silent film grossed over 10 million during the years of 1910-1920? | Intolerance | Birth of a Nation | | Trip to the Moon | | It | The Great Train Robbery | What year did "The Wizard of Oz" and "Gone with the Wind" open in theatres? | 1919 | | 1939 | | 1929 | | 1949 | What date was "Birth of a Nation" released in theatres?...
    1,641 Words | 14 Pages
  • Film Analysis on Metropolis - 1943 Words
    Film Analysis on “ Metropolis” “ Metropolis” directed by Fritz Lang is a science fiction, futuristic style film. It is about the socioeconomic differences in the futuristic city of Metropolis, between workers and the men who designed and ran the city. Its main character Freder is the son of a man who manages Metropolis and has been privileged to live a very luxurious life until he sees a beautiful women, Maria, who leads him to beneath the city, where all the workers of the city toil. He...
    1,943 Words | 5 Pages
  • International Film Festival: Paper
    I would like to turn your attention to The International Filmfestival AROUND THE WORLD IN 14 FILMS that will take place from November 25th to December 3rd 2011 at the cinema Babylon Mitte. The Babylon Mitte is one of the oldest still active cinemas of Berlin and the only one surviving that was a premiere theatre during the silent film era. During the nazi period it served as a hiding place for enemies of the regime. The Filmfestival AROUND THE WORLD IN 14 FILMS will bring together 14...
    444 Words | 2 Pages
  • Images of Women in Film: Memoirs of A Geisha
    Representation of Women in Memoirs of a Geisha Analyzing through the early Hollywood films to the new ones, Asian women have usually been portrayed as either the “Dragon Lady” or the “Butterfly”. The movie Memoirs of a Geisha, by Rob Marshall, perfectly portrays both of the diverse roles of Asian American (Japanese) women in film. Chiyo/Sayuri is the protagonist of the film. She embodies a type of woman that can be described as reflexive, silent and elegant. She is also submissive, delicate,...
    314 Words | 1 Page
  • Comparison of Chinese and American Film Industry
    Comparison of Chinese and American Film industry Introduction A Film, also called a movie, is a modern art that combines pictures and voices to entertain people and express certain ethnic or political attitudes and other concerns. Movies have absorbed the characteristics of literature, photography, painting, music, dancing, writing, sculpture, architecture and many other kinds of arts. However, they are not produced through a simple combination, but rather, with a process that includes...
    6,273 Words | 16 Pages
  • Film Journal–‘Sherlock, Jr.’ by Buster Keaton
    First Journal–‘Sherlock, Jr.’ by Buster Keaton Film, is a powerful and global language. It could be as influential as the state or as simple as a comedy. For example, it represented the voice of the state of USSR under revolution in 1910-1930s. However, in Buster Keaton’s movie---‘Sherlock, Jr.’, it is just an entertainment, a simple reflection on life, and a playground for filmmakers to exercise their imagination. In the period of 1910s-1930s, film production was undergoing its primary...
    758 Words | 2 Pages
  • Midterm 1 Essays - 692 Words
    Midterm 1 Essays 1) Describe the three basic types of music heard in original scores during the silent film era and cites specific examples from The Birth of a Nation. (10 points) The film Birth of a Nation used the three basic types of music heard during the silent film era, which were adaptations, arrangement, and newly composed. Adaptations borrow a complete passage from another source and usually accompany large action scene. The composer Breil used Wagner’s Ride of the Valkyrie to...
    692 Words | 2 Pages
  • Singing in the Rain - 333 Words
    Singing in The Rain Brianna Walsh The Use of Singing and Dance in Singin’ In the Rain Singin’ In the Rain is a fantastic movie that shows the transition between silent films and “talkies.” This film, however, would have no impact what so ever if it were not a musical. The dancing in the movie gave it something different making the movie a classic, while the singing gave the premise of the movie. Lina Lamont would be the first problem with a normal film. If the movie did not have singing,...
    333 Words | 1 Page
  • Just Paper - 462 Words
    Natalie Lanci Professor Scott McClintock Film Studies 104 May 7, 2013 Laughing at the Movies: Comedy in Film History People love to laugh, and they especially love to laugh at the movies. Comedies have been a staple of the movie house since the beginning of the silent film era. In fact, when asked to name an important silent film actor, most people can only name comedians, with Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, and Harold Lloyd at the top of anyone’s list CITATION. Critics and scholars...
    462 Words | 2 Pages
  • Singin in the Rain Review - 387 Words
    Singin' In the Rain Review Singin' In the Rain (1952) Genre: Comedy, Musical, Romance Cast Don Lockwood: Gene Kelly Cosmo Brown: Donald O'Connor Kathy Seldon: Debbie eynolds Lina Lamont: Jean Hagen R.F. Simpson: Millard Mitchell Zelda Zanders: Rita Moreno Roscoe Dexter: Douglas Fowley Singin' in the Rain is one of the most-loved and celebrated film musicals of all time from MGM, before a mass exodus to filmed adaptations of Broadway plays emerged as a standard pattern. It was...
    387 Words | 2 Pages
  • Sound in Sunrise Movie - 636 Words
    The film “Sunrise” (1927) of Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau is one of the first silent films that was released with synchronised sound and incorporates a musical score. The melodramatic masterpiece with an allegorical subtitle “A song of two humans” involves a story about a married farmer who is tempted to leave his domestic life in order to run off with a seductive mistress from The City, who tries to encourage him to drown his wife. Plotting the kill the next day, the farmer invites The Wife for a...
    636 Words | 2 Pages
  • Special Effects in 2001: a Space Odyssey
    Most films today rely on dialogue to further the narrative, allowing characters to explain what is happening at all times. In Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey, dialogue is purposely minimal. In fact, the opening and closing sections of the film have absolutely NO dialogue whatsoever, amounting to nearly one hour of no spoken word. This kind of "deafening quiet" had not been known in movies since the silent film era, however this does not mean the story remains stagnant. Like in the silent...
    873 Words | 3 Pages
  • How Johnny Depp got his acting from Charlie Chaplin
     October 12, 2013 Film Studies/ 2 Johnny Chapton Johnny Depp is one of this generation’s most talented actor. His character development is beyond compare. Johnny Depp has acted in a plethora of movies, but in Benny and Joon and some others, his physical movements are very similar to some very famous silent film actors. Johnny’s character, Sam, is an eccentric one: he’s awkward, silly, and has a very imaginative mind. Charlie Chaplin and Buster...
    523 Words | 2 Pages
  • Essay on Singing in the Rain Movie
    Singing in the Rain Singing in the Rain is an American comedy musical film starring Gene Kelly, Debbie Reynolds, Donald O’Connor and Jean Hagen, and directed by Gene Kelly and Stanley Donen. It offers a comic depiction of Hollywood, and its transition from silent films to talking films. Throughout the movie, people could see many different elements that make the movie musical “Singing in the Rain” great. Because of the sound, especially the music, setting, costumes, make up, and the...
    1,046 Words | 3 Pages
  • Let the right one in - 933 Words
    Close Reading Exercise (Assignment 1) The Artist (2011) Section 1 A) Sound Uses the conventions of the 1920’s silent film era using live orchestral music that reflects, reacts and contributes to the atmosphere on screen. This is expressed through Valentin and Miller’s tap dance in which the music becomes diegetic and synchronous. No dialogue and the use of silence gives homage to silent cinema, which its unexpected success was grounded on the idea that the silence made emotions on...
    933 Words | 3 Pages
  • Crossing a line in the sky - 1495 Words
    In the realist film “Sortie des Usines Lumiere a Lyon” by Auguste and Louis Lumiere in France also known as “Workers leaving Lumiere Factory in Lyon”, the scene of workers mainly women leaving the building is shown by the background music in a jaunty rhythm. It is a black and white film in 46 seconds shown in 1895 often referred as second movie ever made, filmed by Auguste and Louis Lumiere whom are famous for producing realist films. As in other Louis Lumiere films, realist films tend to...
    1,495 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Most Popular Forms of Entertainment in the 1920's
    The most popular forms of Entertainment in the 1920's The 1920s represented thhe era of greatest output in the US movie market. In the 1920's Rin-Tin-Tin the movie dog, became the most famous dog ever to star in the movies. Rin-Tin-Tin was a starving German Shepherd dog during the Great War. Metro Goldwyn Mayer film making studio was founded. A new Pooh Bear story by A.A. Milne was a big hit for little children. Mickey Mouse became everyone's favorite cartoon character in Steamboat Willie....
    509 Words | 2 Pages
  • "Modern Times" Short Critique
    Elaine Woo “Modern Times” short critique The movie ‘Modern Times’ (1936), directed by and staring Charlie Chaplin, was set during the Great Depression and industrial revolution period, where machines and technology were starting to dominate humanity, which led to severe unemployment and poverty. Machines were also served as a method to illustrate how people are supposed to deal with fast-paced living, when factories were starting to use machines and technology as their main ways to produce,...
    504 Words | 2 Pages
  • American Movies of the 1920's
    The years following the devastating war take place prior to 1920 and fortunately left the United States unharmed. The United States was therefore able to experience a decade of peace and prosperity following one of the most devastating wars. One of the reason’s America was able to prosper was because technology played a vital part in bringing the economic and culture prosperity that America experienced in the 1920’s. New advancements, new inventions and the discoveries improved American lives...
    517 Words | 2 Pages
  • Elements of Pastiche in Wall-E, a Postmodernism Analysis
    CHAPTER III ANALYSIS An example of postmodernism application in film is WALL-E. It is an animation movie released in 2008 by Pixar Animation Studios. The film is about a robot named WALL-E. Throughout the story, there are references or similar encounters with the previous or past works in films. These elements are the pastiche of WALL-E. 3.1 Post-Apocalyptic Earth First of all, the setting of earth in WALL-E is clearly a resemblance of other post-apocalypse films. 28 Days Later (2002)...
    1,948 Words | 6 Pages
  • Critique of Metropolis - 841 Words
    Samantha Smith English 1102 R March 12, 2008 Metropolis Critique In Fritz Lang’s silent film Metropolis, several key characteristics made the movie what it is. One important feature is the Art Deco and Modernistic architecture, which gives the setting a futuristic feel considering these movements were exploding at the time. Another characteristic is the character’s costumes and make-up. Since the movie was a silent one, artists had to make the visual impact very vivid. Hands, used as...
    841 Words | 3 Pages
  • A New Modern Canada - 913 Words
    Di 1 Yang Di Mr. Osborne Social Studies 11 4 May 2015 A New Modern Canada In the 1920s, the creation of technological advancements was the most exciting development for that time. There were many types of new advances that help life be easier and stress free. Things such as electric refrigerators and vacuum cleaners helped with the housework. Telephones allowed Canadians to communicate through long distance. Also, the creation of radio ...
    913 Words | 2 Pages
  • Singing in the Rain Review - 2127 Words
    CURTIN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY SCHOOL OF MEDIA, CULTURE AND CREATIVE ARTS ASSIGNMENT COVER SHEET To be attached to all assignments (ALL SECTIONS MUST BE COMPLETED) STUDENT NAME: STEFANIE CHOW___ STUDENT ID: 7E0B7946 / 15649935___ UNIT NAME AND NUMBER: SCREEN ARTS 111___ DUE DATE: 13 AUGUST 2012___ WORD COUNT: 1974___ TUTORIAL DAY AND TIME: FRIDAY 0800AM-1100AM___ TUTOR’S NAME: MS. THARSHNI KUMARASAMY__ IT IS ESSENTIAL THAT YOUR...
    2,127 Words | 6 Pages
  • The actor - 595 Words
     THE ACTOR 2011 In 1927, silent film George Valentin is standing for pictures outside of his latest film. When a young woman, Peppy Miller, accidentally hits into him. Valentin ignores it, and shows off the cameras. “The next day Peppy finds herself on the front page of newspaper with headline who is that girl” Later, she goes to auditory as a dancer for Valentins show. Like that she becomes more and more popular, and when the...
    595 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Evolution of Hispanicsstereotypes - 12216 Words
    The Evolution of the Hispanic Stereotype in Films and Television (1909-1960s) November 18, 2012 “Lucy, I’m Home!” With these words first uttered on October 15, 1951, Americans were introduced to arguably the first Hispanic[1] actor who became both embraced and beloved by the public in what was to become the most watched series in all of television history. Cuban born Desi Arnaz portrayed the character of Ricky Ricardo, the bongo-playing husband from the I Love Lucy[2]...
    12,216 Words | 31 Pages
  • Sejarah Video - 5564 Words
    Drama Films are serious presentations or stories with settings or life situations that portray realistic characters in conflict with either themselves, others, or forces of nature. A dramatic film shows us human beings at their best, their worst, and everything in-between. Each of the types of subject-matter themes have various kinds of dramatic plots. Dramatic films are probably the largest film genre because they include a broad spectrum of films. See also crime films, melodramas, epics...
    5,564 Words | 19 Pages
  • Nathan "Songs of Silence" - 333 Words
    The chapters of Songs of Silence hold together as a chorus of songs from one community, but shaped by the recollections of a narrator whose perspective ranges from the innocence of childhood to the maturity of a young adult who emerges unbroken from a failed relationship. One such chapters is ‘Nathan’ and here the narrator is the reflective adult with a sophisticated notion of the wide range if meanings ‘silence’ holds. Through the character of Nation she is able to present some aspects of...
    333 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hollywood moves influence in society
    Hollywood moves influence in society Hollywood movies have had an important effect on cinema across the world since the early 20th century. Its history is sometimes separated into four main periods: the silent film era, classical Hollywood cinema, New Hollywood, and the contemporary period. Is clear that Hollywood movies have an impact and influence in society. From my point of view the Hollywood movies are not a bad influence to society. Most of these movies are made after books and we...
    339 Words | 1 Page
  • American Comedy Through Out the Decades
    American Comedy Throughout the Decades American comedy films are one of the oldest genres in which the main point is purely focused on humor. From silent films of the early 1920s to modern classics such as The Hangover, American comedies have transformed though out the years. American comedies became popular as a way of escape from reality in the 1920s. It was a way to bring out humor and laughter from the audience watching these films. American comedies would take serious social issues...
    1,050 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Fall of Monopoly: an Analysis on the Studio System of Hollywood in the Golden Era
    The Fall of Monopoly ‘As far as the filmmaking process is concerned, stars are essentially worthless -- and absolutely essential.’ -William Goldman It started with Florence Lawrence as the ‘Biograph Girl’ in the early 1900’s, and bred into the formation of the Universal Studios by one smart producer by the name of Carl Laemmle. The birth of Hollywood had never experienced a joyful transition for editors and actors, who back in the day were treated like hired help by directors. The...
    1,802 Words | 5 Pages
  • Charlie Chaplin Talks Back.
    Charlie Chaplin’s Modern Times is a satire of the modernization and industrialization of society during the great depression. It is a tragic socio-political comedy that reveals the harsh living conditions of the time. The movie represents Chaplin’s critique of the period’s industrialization. To Chaplin, modernization reduced the workers to mere extensions of the machinery they worked with. Modern Times’ use of sound enhanced this critique against the dehumanizing qualities of...
    978 Words | 3 Pages
  • Film's Knowledgeable Gain - 981 Words
    Film’s Knowledgeable Gain Millions of people watch movies on a daily bases, oblivious to that fact that they are learning something worthwhile. Whether the genre is Sci-Fi, Action & Adventure, Romance, or even a Period film, there is always something that can be taken from it. Watching movies is a great way to gain knowledge on any given subject. You can learn a lot just by looking at how far film has progressed since the time it was just invented. Patented in 1867 by William...
    981 Words | 3 Pages
  • melee Trip to the moon - 686 Words
    Méliès’s Trip to the Moon The film opens with a gathering of academics in a lecture hall. They have robes, beards and pointed hats. They are standing at first in ranks in the room, five more men join them and are given telescopes by female servants. The leader enters and assumes a position at a blackboard on the left where he draws an image of the Earth and the Moon and a bullet-shaped craft landing on the Moon. They all being discussing or arguing about the project. The technique used for...
    686 Words | 2 Pages
  • American Movies of the 1920's
    Running head: AMERICA AND THE MOVIES OF THE 1920’S February 13, 2012 US HIS II ABSTRACT The movies of the 1920’s provided one of America’s most forms of entertainment after World War One. Americans were able to spend a little extra and enjoy such events as they were not devastates during with war. The movies for the American people began soon after the invention of automobiles. The movies provided communications and entertainment and soon began to open the American people to...
    658 Words | 2 Pages
  • Entertainment In The 1920s - 383 Words
    Entertainment in the 1920s By Joshua Boonstra Movies Movies back in the 1920s usually had sound. They were shown with piano or organ accompaniment, sound effects, and subtitles. Comedy was the most popular type of movies during this time of films. The humour in these films were very slapstick-meaning people thought it was funny when someone fell on a banana peel or got a custard pie in the face. Buster Keaton, Laurel Hardy, and Charlie Chaplin were some famous comedians. Many Canadians...
    383 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Disenchanted Research Paper - 3443 Words
    Research paper: The Disenchanted F. Scott Fitzgerald’s life and work were in a knot from the start; his profession spanned one of the most tumultuous eras of the century, and from the very start he was the creator and the victim of the new culture of celebrity which accompanied the rise of modern technology. Budd Schulberg masterfully created a character that closely and in many ways represents Fitzgerald in his later years; Manley Halliday is that character. “His mind’s eye, incurably...
    3,443 Words | 9 Pages
  • Movie Reflection - 2707 Words
    What is in your movie? ENG 225 Hannah Judson March 15, 2010 What is in your movie? How does one analysis a movie? How does one watch a movie? What are you looking for in the movie? When you watch the movie, does the movie tell you a story or do you learn any life lessons from it? Movie making is considered an industry and an art form; as an artist media, it can come in a form of expression. A movie has so many components intertwined into it to make it overall and complete. Therefore, is...
    2,707 Words | 7 Pages
  • Cinema as a Language - 1430 Words
    Cinema as a Language Silence film had reached its artistic peak by 1928. It seemed like cinema had developed into an art most perfectly with silence. The realism that sound would bring could only be seen as chaos. However, the sound proved that it didn’t come to destroy; on the contrary, it had a responsibility and it came to fulfill its mission to the cinema. The point is whether the technical revolution formed by sound track actually the aesthetic revolution. Considering editing, we...
    1,430 Words | 4 Pages
  • singin in the rain - 2689 Words
    Abilene Christian University Singin’ in the Rain Study Guide! Table of Contents Synopsis………………………………………….Page 1 Director’s Concept……………………………….Page 2 The Creation of Singin’ in the Rain………………Page 3 Slang of the 1920’………………………………..Page 6 History of the 1920’………………………..…..Page 8 1920’s Hollywood Stars….………………………….Page 12 Singin’ in the Rain in YOUR class…………………Page 14 Synopsis: Main Characters: Don Lockwood, Hollywood Star Lina...
    2,689 Words | 12 Pages
  • Comparison between Charlie Chaplin's "The Kid" and Rowan Atkinson's "Mr. Bean - The Ultimate Disaster Movie"
    Name: Toh Lai Hee Class: IA04B (Interactive Art) Lecturer: Lydia Subject: Art History The most apparent similarity between these two films is that both films revolve around the daily lives of the main characters. The main characters, Charlie and Mr. bean, in The Kid and Mr. Bean - The Ultimate Disaster Movie respectively, both have child-like qualities, and the tendency to be rather mischievous. Mr. Bean is naive and self-centered, sometimes to the extent of becoming somewhat mean. Despite...
    1,466 Words | 5 Pages
  • Sense of Humour - 387 Words
    a good sense of humor is one of the most important human qualities Nowadays, people have a lot of problems in many fields of life. When people have a stressful day, they may experience headaches or sleeping difficulties. Some people agree that a good sense of humor is one of the most important human qualities while other people have different opinion that a good sense of humor is important for life . I personally believe that a good sense of humor is one of the most important human qualities....
    387 Words | 1 Page
  • Changes During the 1900's
    Throughout the 1900’s great and monumental changes were made in our country. Changes the Like Fair Labors Act of 1938, the Dyer Anti Lynching bill, and Women’s Suffrage all took place in at this time. The 1900's also brought in Muckraking, the Dust Bowl, the Great Depression, and the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre. The mid 1900s gave way to crime and gangs a problem that we still have today. Satchmo and Louis Armstrong along with Duke Ellington, And Frank Sinatra are all products of the 1900's....
    707 Words | 2 Pages
  • Comparison/ Contrast of Chaplin and Keaton
    Comparison/ Contrast of Chaplin and Keaton Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton are the founding actors for the comedian world. They both starred in numerous silent films in the early 1900s. They are commonly compared for their numerous similarities in their acting careers. Chaplin and Keaton are both comedians, they act in such a way to get the maximum laughs out of their audience. Comedic acting was much more difficult in silent films then it is now in regular films. In silent films...
    441 Words | 2 Pages
  • Movies: The Changing Society in the 1920's
    Movies: The Changing Society in the 1920s Tina Wang US History March 7th, 2014 2 The 1920s was an important time period in American history due to the significant transformation of the film industry that further influenced the economy and the society. Both silent and sound movies were largely produced during the time that not only made the entertainment more popular but also created a new trend in the society. With such big influences, the economy in the United States also relied...
    2,968 Words | 15 Pages
  • Cecil B. Demille’s the Ten Commandments, 1956
    Cecil B. DeMille’s The Ten Commandments, 1956 This film is a partial remake of DeMille’s 1923 silent film. In remaking this epic story, DeMille made the decision to create an historical series of events with as much realism and special effects as were available to film makers in the 1950’s. While there are many elements of this film that could be discussed at length, one of the greatest to draw your attention to the characters and the background is the art of costuming. “What a costume...
    297 Words | 1 Page
  • Review of rahomomn - 606 Words
    ‘Rashomon’ directed by Kurosawa is considered one of the most highly ranked foreign films. This film was made in the early 50’s and was one of the first films to introduce the element of flashbacks. The film is entirely based on the concept of flashback with 3 witnesses; all giving their accounts on the murder that had taken place. All 3 take the blame upon them and confess to have been the culprits. There is a build up of confusion at this point and constant questions are raised as to who is...
    606 Words | 2 Pages
  • Why Movies Are so Popular
    Like most young guys I like movies very much. Movies in English are an effective tool for learning English. I remember when I went to New Oriental to study English I always worried about my poor listening skill. Then I accepted a teacher’s advice and started to watch some English movies. I can learn some useful words and expressions from them. Gradually I found that English is not so difficult to understand and it became more and more interesting to me. Now I can say movies not only improve my...
    1,331 Words | 4 Pages
  • Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde Book vs Movie
    Luka Stojanovic Mr. Horner 9/13/2010 Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde: Film vs. Book The book and the movie Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde weren’t too different. The 1920 silent film, “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,” wasn’t too different from the book. Even though this film version of the book was silent, I could still tell what was happening in the movie due to the fact that I watched the movie as I read the book to be able to compare and interpret what was going on. The...
    413 Words | 2 Pages
  • Mass Entertainment in the 1920's
    Radio dominated the Twenties, with roughly 3 million Americans owning radios by 1923. Most listeners still used crystal sets with earphones to receive news and bulletins, advertising and music. The appeal of the spoken word attracted audiences and advertisers, while publishers were forced to improve upon its image to retain profits. Television, capable of wireless transmission of moving pictures, was first demonstrated in 1926, combining sight and sound to rival radio. Tabloids continued...
    1,376 Words | 4 Pages
  • City Lights Movie Reflection
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  • “the Day the Earth Stood Still”, (1951) vs. “the Day the Earth Stood Still”, (2008)
    “The Day the Earth Stood Still”, (1951) vs. “The Day the Earth Stood Still”, (2008) From the 19th to the 20th century there have been many changes in film. Movies went from silent features in black and white, to color with surround sound, and now to digital 3D. One of the biggest changes occurred with special effects and the help of CGI (Computer Generated Images), which enhanced movie scenes and brought imagination to life. History has shown us that technology dictates where and how we...
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  • Gone with the Wind - 1949 Words
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  • Motion Picture History - 968 Words
    Before World War I, films were being made mostly European countries and in Japan. When the war interrupted European filmmaking, however, the American film industry began to dominate the world market. In the years between 1917 and 1927 the silent film reached the peak of its development. United States had the largest film industry and American films dominated the international market. Germany and Japan still had some movie industries but mostly left to domestic. Many nations found film production...
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  • Use of Sound in Sous Les Toits de Paris
    The coming of sound, although it was very popular with the audience, was not welcomed by everyone. Many saw the technical innovation as a barbaric intrusion to silent cinema. Among those people was Renée Clair, a French director of the thirties, extremely popular internationally. Like many others, he dreaded the arrival of sound however, because the public’s demand for talkies was so strong, he had no choice but to adapt to modern times. However his use of sound is quite particular and very...
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  • Charlie Chaplins Modern Times
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  • Mise en Scene in Nosferatu
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  • Charlie Chaplin's City Lights
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  • Nosferatu (1922) – Opening Scene Critique
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  • Nanook - 747 Words
    In Nanook of the North, both the idea of reproduction and representation come into play. The documentary is able to use both of the ideas of film Scholar Bill Nichols in order to help demonstrate the struggles that Nanook, an Inuk tribesman from the Canadian Arctic, and his family must go through in order to survive. While the producer of the film, Robert J. Flaherty, attempts to make an accurate representation of how the Inuk live, he appears to make part of the film a reproduction by modifying...
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  • Birth of a Nation - 1323 Words
    The silent film I chose to watch “The Birth of a Nation” is a 1915 American drama, directed by D.W Griffith, produced by D.W. Griffith and Harry Aitken, co-written by D.W Griffith, T.F. Dixon J.R. and Frank E. Woods, and was based on the novel and play “The Clansman” both by T.F. Dixon J.R. It was originally released on February 8, 1915 and was presented in two parts, separated by an intermission, as it is over three hours long. The film follows the lives of two families in Civil War era...
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  • In the Mood for Love - 1574 Words
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  • Woody Allen's Sleeper - 568 Words
    Sleeper “Sleeper” is a film, which at first glance, appears to be about nothing but making people laugh, but when examined more closely might appear to be a commentary on politics, consumerism and even love. This film is supposed to be Woody Allen’s take on a modern silent film, and there are definitely similarities to the silent film classics of Buster Keaton and Charlie Chaplin, most notably the physical humor that defined the slapstick sub-genre of comedy. Scenes like those with the giant...
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  • Music Video Analysis - 495 Words
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  • Tma01 - 1151 Words
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  • essay on city life - 1384 Words
    If only one of Charles Chaplin's films could be preserved, “City Lights” (1931) would come the closest to representing all the different notes of his genius. It contains the slapstick, the pathos, the pantomime, the effortless physical coordination, the melodrama, the bawdiness, the grace, and, of course, the Little Tramp--the character said, at one time, to be the most famous image on earth. When he made it, three years into the era of sound, Chaplin must have known that “City Lights” might...
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  • Chaplin vs Buster - 1306 Words
    Question 1 The early 1900s mark a great boom within the genre of the silent comedy. By the 1920s it was not uncommon to see B list silent comedies ringing bigger bucks then the more prestigious features. As the decade would progress feature length comedies become more and more common place and stars are born. Stars like Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton. This paper aims to contrast the two comedian’s/director’s art forms. While doing so I will draw on a film for each, Charles’ feature, Modern...
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  • How Sound Is Used Expressively in M
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  • Cultural imperialism - 718 Words
    Throughout chapters 7 and 10, the textbook has a lot of information regarding the concept of cultural imperialism. “This concept of cultural imperialism is the argument that a large bulk of media products flow from the West, especially the United States, and so powerfully shape the cultures of other nations that they amount to a cultural form of domination” (Croteau, Hoynes, and Milan Location 8298). In this essay I will explain whether or not this concept provides a useful framework to...
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  • Motion Pictures Between Old Time and Modern
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  • The Alamo Drafthouse - Case Review
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  • The History of French Filmmaking - 1753 Words
    Alan Williams book, Republic of Images: A History of French Filmmaking begins its long journey through time in the 1800’s before cinema was invented. Williams explains that the three necessary aspects of film were to come, the “bricolage” meaning the analysis of movement, the optical synthesis of movement, and photography. There were many important people over the course of this book that had huge influences on putting together the bricolage as well as path that this most popular media traveled....
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  • Metropolis - 468 Words
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  • mack sennet - 540 Words
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  • Charlie Chaplin - 1411 Words
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