Ethical Leader LDR6135 Final Paper

Topics: Leadership, Business ethics, Social responsibility Pages: 7 (2350 words) Published: November 10, 2013


Personal Philosophy in Ethical Leadership

SUIYAN SITU

Introduction
Leadership is no longer merely a symbol of power. It is not only about one’s style, expertise, and technique, but also about bravely taking on the challenge of ethics. Ethical practices are essential for an organization to carry out business while remaining more viable and adaptable to changes over time. Every leader will develop his own philosophy that specifies what is important and what is not to him. It is a personal policy about how to make sound decisions and treat people with respect. In my opinion, there are five important principles of proper leadership ethics required for me to become a more thoughtful leader in the future. They direct a leader to build up a company as a moral community, to be responsible for the employees and the society as well, to be honest to others, to serve and to treat others with respect. 1. Ethical leaders build a community

It is a leader’s responsibility to make the corporation a flourishing place wherein people feel satisfied. A leader is also a community constructor. As Robert Solomon (1994) indicates, a corporation is more than an instrument for financial gain. It is a community, which consists of a sense of belonging, shared values, a mission, and mutual interests. Leadership has a strong influence on the groups of people achieving their common goal. It requires that the leader agrees with the direction taken by the organization, and takes everyone’s purposes into consideration. The established common goal needs to be compatible with everyone and leaders cannot impose their own will on their followers. Leaders are not dictators, but people who use their influence to lead their team to establish a mutual faith and to move toward a goal that is beneficial for both themselves and followers. James MacGregor Burns (2003) develops transformational leadership based on this idea. He states that leaders take the initiative to mobilize followers to participate in organizational change, encourage a sense of collective identity and build up individual’s feelings of meaningfulness in the organization. As with building a democratic organization, leaders and followers have strong interaction between one another, and leaders inspire followers instead of wielding power over them. With such leadership, everyone shares his feelings, recognizes his values, and contributes to attaining the mutual goal. The corporation is a place for human fulfillment. While the members are pursuing their goals, they are also transforming themselves. Leaders, who are coercive and fail to take others’ interests into consideration, will negatively impact their groups and lose their credibility. This is the case of Hitler, the former Germany leader. He abused his power to coerce his followers to satisfy his own will and meet his goal, failing to promote the goodness of humankind. Therefore, as a community builder for the organization, a leader has to attend to the community’s goal by liberating his followers rather than enslaving them. Leaders who don’t mobilize followers to assist in the adaptation of the change of organization will make mistakes in business strategies. Nokia used to be the dominant and pace-setting mobile-phone maker, yet, its business has been shrinking since Apple and Android began competing with it. Nokia underestimated the importance of the transition to the new smartphone market. The executives overestimated the demand for hardware in the mobile phone market and the strength of the corporate brand. They also didn’t carefully listen to the suggestion made by the marketing team. So, they were stuck with its own operating system and failed to make any transformation to adapt to the change of market. 2. Ethical leaders are servants

When given authority over others, it is not merely a chance for leader to enjoy the power, but to take over the burden of caring for the company. Being a leader means one is...

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